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Ford demonstrates new eWheelDrive research vehicle

Ford demonstrates new eWheelDrive research vehicle

Ford and its technology partner Schaeffler have demonstrated their eWheelDrive research vehicle, which hopes to improve urban mobility and parking through making cars more agile.
 
The Fiesta-based car has independent electric motors in its rear wheels rather than a standard engine, allowing for more nimble manoeuvring in urban environments.  
 
What's more, the eWheelDrive steering system may even allow for motorists to move their vehicle sideways into a parking space.
 
The space left beneath the bonnet where the engine and transmission would otherwise be could help facilitate the development of smaller electric cars, with a four-seat vehicle being as small as a present day two-seat car.
 
"This is an exciting project to work on with Schaeffler because it potentially opens new options for the development of zero emission vehicles with very efficient packaging and exceptional manoeuvrability," said Pim van der Jagt, Ford's director of research and advanced engineering in Europe.
 
In-wheel motors have all of the components necessary for drive integrated within the hub, including the motor, braking and cooling system. They are seen by some industry experts as a vital technology in the future to help alleviate the crowding of urban areas.